Why People Eat Turkey As Their Traditional Meal At Thanksgiving

Everybody has their own unique set up when it comes to the type of dish they choose to prepare when thanksgiving come around, some prefer mash potatoes, and gravy others prefer sweet potato pie, no matter how you decide to cook your meal one thing unites us all. That’s right you guessed it, the turkey! But the question here is why people eat turkey as their traditional meal at Thanksgiving

why people eat Turkey as their traditional meal at Thanksgiving

why people eat Turkey as their traditional meal at Thanksgiving

The history 

Why people eat Turkey as their traditional meal at Thanksgiving quite a mystery. The theories differ depending on which historian telling the story.

The Early American settlers who kept letters and records, wrote the first colonists who dined with the native Wampanoag Indians enjoyed beef and fowl (a domesticated bird) the standard dish at the time. This traditional meal will later become known as the first Thanksgiving.

Historians can neither deny or confirm what type of fowl was served back in those days. Edward Winslow wrote a letter, a pilgrim who traveled foreign lands mentions a turkey hunting trip before the meal.

why people eat Turkey as their traditional meal at Thanksgiving

Another theory attributes the Thanksgiving turkey to the queen of England. During the 16th century a fleet of Spanish ships sunk on the way to attack England. The queen at the time Elizabeth received the good news while eating dinner, elated with the good news she ordered goose to be served. This was an inspiring reaction, and some say the early settlers roasted a turkey instead of a goose.

The wild turkey is the native to the lands of North America. Benjamin Franklin, one of the greatest scientific minds of his time went on record saying this made the turkey a more suitable national bird for the united states than the bald eagle. His statement was not universally accepted by everyone. however, the bald eagle became the national emblem for the united states in 1782. However, Mr. Franklin’s words did not fall on deaf ears as the turkey has a day all to itself, Thanksgiving.

Here’s some interesting turkey trivia to share around the table:

• Wild turkeys can fly, but domesticated turkeys cannot
• Turkeys can run up to 20 miles per hour
• The skin that hangs down from a turkey’s neck is called a ‘wattle.’